Posts Tagged ‘housekeeper’

Labels? Who needs Labels?

     Not long after we moved in, I woke at 5 a.m. to the sounds of gagging and rushed to my mother’s bedside.clock        When I spoke with my local sisters, I was told that she has been doing this for years. About every three or four months, she becomes intensely nauseated and must be monitored for dehydration.

Jane, my oldest sister, said, “The doctor can’t find any reason for this. He said, if she insists, he will put a scope down her throat and see if he can find anything. I got scoped and they found I have a hiatal hernia, but there is nothing they can do about that.”

We agreed it would be worse for our 85-year-old mother if we forced a scope down her throat and they found something but there was nothing they could do for it.

Elderly woman

         It’s bad enough to be a parent and have to sit by while your child is suffering, but when the one who wiped your nose is ill, the feelings shift to a different level.

     Not long ago I called her for relationship advice. I’ve always sought her advice on things related to parenting, cooking, sewing and so many other topics.  If I  called her when I felt ill, she always had homespun advice.

     Scrape an apple for diarrhea, eat a spoon full of sugar for hiccups.

An apple a day

Drink a cold glass of water with baking soda for digestive disorders.

cold water

Give the other person space.

I need my space

She was always right, too. So, when she called my name in distress and looked to me for help, I traded in my HANC hat for a nurse’s and became the caregiver.

What is the proper first-aid to administer to your mother when she is throwing up?

First Aid Station

When my children were sick, I kissed their foreheads and wrists to check for a fever. I rubbed their backs to ease congestion and relax them.  Today, I held the pink, plastic hospital pan under Momma’s chin and waited. I had a cool, wet washcloth ready and stroked her cheek when she thought she’d finished, but I wanted to do so much more.

While she napped fretfully, I emailed my brothers and sisters a quick update.

cup of trea or coffee

My brother, Joe, who lives next door, came over for coffee at 8, but before he could finish his first cup, I had to return to Momma’s room for another round.

over the counter medications

I couldn’t go back to sleep and I dared not make much noise, so I wondered what I might find in her large medicine cabinet of ingredients with names I cannot pronounce that might bring her relief, should she vomit a third time and I wondered why she was sick.

My sister, Bernie, suggested Benadryl might ease Momma’s upset stomach. “It can’t hurt her.”

doctor prescribed medications

      I wasn’t certain, so I checked her shelves that are stocked with over-the-counter and prescription medications as well as with herbal and folk remedies. I found one Jane had marked with a sharpie: Nausea. I was relieved to see it could be taken sublingually.

memory patvch

Along with her Exelon patch for “mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease” and her daily and nightly prescriptions for various other age-related issues are two other prescription bottles. One is an antibiotic she must take prior to certain dental procedures and the other is the prescription for nausea. When I moved in, with Jane’s approval, I discarded the prescriptions she no longer takes, since they had all expired.

Nearly an hour after her second episode, and moments before I found the prescription, she vomited a third time. After she calmed from that, she placed the small pill under her tongue where it dissolved and was absorbed into her bloodstream and again, she napped. Another hour later, she woke up, still queasy, but stronger and thirsty.

label

My friend, Turner, suggested her problem could be a side effect of her blood thinner. She’s such a smart woman!

 I discovered some interesting things about the rat poison doctors have prescribed for my mother.

warning label

Warfarin side effects that require immediate medical attention are:

  • Severe bleeding (This is why we have to guard against injuries and bruising, which could disguise internal bleeding.)
  • Black stool or bleeding from the rectum
  • Skin conditions such as hives, a rash or itching (This is a problem she’s had once since I moved in with her. Now, when I see unexplained whelps and rashes, I will know it’s not a spider bite or allergic reaction, but a side effect to her medicine.)
  •  Swelling of the face, throat, mouth, legs, feet or hands (only once, her left knee was swollen)
  •  Bruising that comes about without an injury you remember (We tend to recall every time she bumps herself and we always watch for easy bruising to follow.)
  • Chest pain or pressure (This occurred today, with the vomiting.)
  • Nausea or vomiting (This seems to be under control, but she is still very weak.)
  • Fever or flu-like symptoms (Once, before today, I thought she had a fever, but the thermometer did not indicate an elevated body temperature.)
  • Joint or muscle aches (She constantly complains of pain in her knee and other areas, so she takes an OTC pain pill.)
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty moving (Some days are much worse than others)
  • Numbness or tingling in any part of your body (she has recently complained that her hands are falling asleep.)
  • Painful erection lasting four hours or longer (at least I don’t have to worry about this one!)

Although rare, warfarin can also cause skin tissue death (necrosis) and gangrene requiring amputation. This complication most often happens three to eight days after you start taking warfarin. If you notice any sores, changes in skin color or temperature, or severe pain on your skin, notify your doctor immediately.

Less serious warfarin side effects to tell your doctor about:

  • Fatigue (Some days, she complains that she is just feeling lazy. I wonder. . .)
  • Gas (I thought this was just my cooking.)
  • Feeling cold (She complains of feeling cold, even on the hottest days and did not want us to buy a new air conditioner because she liked the heat.)
  • Pale skin (This is something we can blame on our family tree.)
  • Changes in the way foods taste (Ah, so, now things are beginning to make sense. She was prescribed to take Warfarin; a side effect of Warfarin is that food tastes differently and sometimes it doesn’t appeal at all, therefore, her “appetite” is considered down and voila! another prescription is written for an appetite stimulant…oh, the western medicine plot thickens.)
  • Hair loss (Only her hairdresser knows for sure.)

check these symptoms

     I have since checked all her medications to see what other side effects might present problems. Maybe I can keep my HANC hat on longer and avoid the nurse/caregiver hat in the future.

     Twelve hours after the first sound of discomfort, Momma was weak, but no longer vomiting. She didn’t have much to eat or drink, but I kept offering ginger ale and water.

     We may not like reading the warning labels, but they can certainly help understand why those in our care suddenly start displaying strange symptoms.

 

     Labels! We DO need those stinking warning labels!

Boy hugs space man

 

 

 

     I’ve noticed a tendency toward stomach upsets when she worries – especially about finances. Her life has been turned around since we moved in. Although she appreciates our help, she can’t deny we’ve changed things in her world and in her routines. The changes, while good, can still be stressful and stress causes all sorts of dis-ease.

 

     Maybe she needs to hug a space man or maybe she needs a little space, of her own. It can’t be easy to suddenly have the noise and activity of a family after so many years of solitude.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two Weeks as a HANC

When we visit our parents as adults, we want to believe everything is under control, as it was when we were children.

     We may see or smell things we’d rather not, but to keep the fantasy alive, we tend to ignore them.Gransmomma and siblings

   Usually, we make a point to clean something or do some yard maintenance on our visits, but mostly we visit, because our parents want to spend TIME with us, not watch us work.Clock in town square 

     Once we are back home again, we can pat ourselves on our backs for whatever we did. We might tut-tut to our spouses or siblings and think about what must be done “one day,” but we don’t want to believe our parents are anything less than super-humans. We want to remember them as strong and independent, virile and always capable.

Matt's guns

 Those of us with large families hope someone else will inevitably step up and take charge.

      For me, living more than 300 miles away, I had no option but to allow my sisters and brothers who lived closer to do just that. Each did what could be done  around schedules and personal requirements. Each filled a special role.

     My role was to visit as often as my job allowed and do what I could during the few days I was “home.”

     Over the years, our mother’s physical capabilities have declined and her memory lapses have worried us more and more. We have talked one-on-one with each other, but never as a collective family about her increasing need for more companionship, better nutrition, help with housework or more diversions to help her focus mentally.

variety of produce

     Once, my sister’s husband was driving Momma’s car, with Momma on the front passenger’s seat when Momma became startled by what she thought was an oncoming car.

      Momma decided for herself that she would no longer drive.

      She didn’t suffer the indignation of having her driver’s license taken from her, but she told me she misses not being able to trust herself behind the wheel of a car. She still loves to “take a drive,” and told me after her recent trip for bloodwork, “This is fun. I don’t care if it is just to the doctor’s office and back. I like to get out of the house.”

Oak tree lined dirt road

      Now, that we are living here, I can take her for a drive any day of the week. We don’t even need a destination.

 I hope to do more of this kind of driving once we are unpacked…at least, maybe after I have finished cleaning the kitchen. Goals are good.

redundant swiffer

     I try to clean, organize and unpack a little each day and I hope we aren’t confounding her, though sometimes, I think we must. There have been some incidents that make me know we need to be here and I am tempted to take over, but she loves her independence and I must remember she handled all her daily-living activities long before we moved in. She is proud to load or empty the dishwasher, but I do all the meal preparation – sometimes with her nearby. She still is able to do laundry, and I am pleased to allow her that chore. Today, she patched a pair of my shorts that had ripped. I would have probably worn them, ripped and all, until I could no longer do so. She enjoys doing needlework and I may end up in patches, but each one is lovingly stitched.

 quilted

     She is headstrong, but reasonable.

    Some changes make her wonder, “Why, after all these years, do I need to do that?”

As long as we explain what we are doing and why we must do it a certain way, she accepts the changes with grace. She just needs to know why.

 

     For many years, she has lived in a house with almost no insulation in the walls or attic, which makes her air conditioner work harder than it needs to. It also makes the house extremely hot during the summer. She’s on blood-thinning medication, which means she is relatively comfortable in a house that is warmer than 80 degrees. What she doesn’t seem to understand is that at 84 degrees or even 90, as it was one day, her thinking is impaired. She was very grouchy during the hottest days. She didn’t want us to purchase a window air conditioner, but when I told her we needed to, so I could cook and clean, she accepted it. We paid for it, but she’s not always certain she didn’t buy it.

    

     We can’t easily open most of the windows to allow a cross breeze and the roof has no venting for the heat. I noticed her mood improved when we were able to cool the house to anything below 78. She has started wearing a knitted shawl in the early mornings so I can do my household chores in more comfort. We compromised without even discussing the problem.

      At times, she smiles when I do something my father used to do or that she once did, but can no longer do. Nostalgia can be good.

     She has been writing her memories in a variety of notebooks and they are random. She knows there is no “book order” to them, but I hope to share them, soon.

Journal pages blank

     She retells stories, not remembering that she may have told the same story, almost verbatim, a day ago – an hour ago – five minutes ago. We do our best to listen and react as if it is new. Sometimes, she stops herself or asks us to stop her if she is repeating.

     Sometimes, she simply forgets things. “I never” and “I know I didn’t” precede many declarations. Whenever I remind her, respectfully and gently, in detail, she usually says, “Oh, yes. Thank you for reminding me.” It must pain her to know that her memory is slipping away from her. She often says, “I pray all my children can live long lives, but I do hope you can be healthy and not like me.”

      The worst for me is when she and my husband each want my attention at the same time and neither knows the other is also speaking to me. Some days, I just want to cry. Some days, I do.

 mom and son

 

     This is but one day in our new life adventure. There are many challenges and many rewards. When I moved out of this town nearly 15 years ago, my mother managed a hotel and was one of the most amazing people I knew, physically, emotionally, intellectually and there were few women whom I felt compared to her. I still feel that way about her.

I wanted to live an adventurous life in a city and for three years, I did just that. Then, we moved to a smaller city and my life became that of a suburbanite career woman. I immersed myself in my job and was content to visit my family whenever I could, but I also contented myself to vacation in more exotic venues as often as money permitted.

       Now, I have returned home to a more bucolic life and it’s good.

 

torch

     As I listened to a whippoorwill while standing between two tiki torches that kept the mosquitoes at bay  I thought about today’s achievements in addition to my editing and writing. It is good. It is very good, indeed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Role Reversal Reverses Roles for a Week

medical equipment     When my mother was hospitalized for her last fall, one of the doctors  told the family to prepare for her to be placed in a nursing home.  At the time, I was living more than 300 miles away, but my sisters and brothers kept me posted on her situation until I could come spend some time with her.

     Seeing her in the hospital bed on a morphine pump for the pain in her hip, ribs and shoulder was difficult, but watching her reaction to the medication during the times between the pump was one of the hardest things I had dealt with up to that point in time. She was hallucinating and she was afraid.

     The family made arrangements to hire someone to assist with her daily needs during her rehabilitation at home. We all agreed to avoid a nursing home at all costs, if possible and I suppose the seed was planted at that time for me to eventually become a caregiver for my mother. I never saw myself as a caregiver and to use that word in association with my mother causes me discomfort.

 

With home health nurse 7-11-10with visiting nurse 7-11-10     In home nurses and therapists monitored her progress and encouraged her to do more than sit in her chair and watch television.

     Still, with limited mobility and a fear of falling again, she prefers sitting to moving and her mild Alzheimer’s disease seems to be the reason she prefers game shows and court TV to her former active social life. Add to this, her hearing difficulties and some days become much more frustrating than others.

    If I’m off my game, even a little, I can’t provide the care my mother needs and we both feel the difference in our relationship. I want, always, to be the best Companion and Activities director for her, in addition to a skilled Nutritionist and Housekeeper, but even the best HANC has limits.

     Knowing those limits is key to a successful relationship.

Today, I felt vulnerable and so typed in “Dealing with Dementia” online. One of my first links led me to the manufacturer of one of her medications. I found great information here.

Flexibility Is the Key to Working Together

The changing relationship between the person with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease and the caregiver is a lot like the relationship between two ballroom dancers. When a couple dances, one person is the leader and the other is the follower.

In your relationship now, the caregiver may have to do a little more leading and less following. And the person with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease may need to find a way to follow that is comfortable.

Fortunately, Alzheimer’s disease usually progresses slowly, and in most cases you can shift your roles little by little. Being flexible is required. That is usually true for successful relationships. So, if you can stay flexible, you are likely to find ways to be close to each other. And that is staying connected.

 

big old oak     As strong and stalwart as the oak in her yard, my mother would never ask for help. She didn’t turn it down, though, when offered and she has been very appreciative of our presence.

     There are times I feel as if I have a very opinionated, 85-year-old toddler in my care and other times I am very much her child. The past week was the latter, as I was dealing with a migraine as well as simple hay fever and I simply did not feel like doing the things I came here to do.

     It may have empowered her to be in charge again as she did her best to help take care of me.     daffodil closeup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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