Archive for the ‘HANC’ Category

Are you Burned Out?

If you can no longer remember what compelled you to become a caregiver, you just might have caregiver burnout! Remember, you cannot care for anyone if you do not first care for yourself. There is nothing wrong with asking for help from family, friends or agencies that can provide respite care. Be strong enough to take care of the caregiver.

If you answer yes to these questions, it may be time for you to take a break or re-evaluate your situation. Don’t smolder and burn until you explode.

  • Has it been more than two months since you’ve had a weekend to yourself to do whatever you wanted, even if that was to do nothing?
  • Have you cried for what seems to be “no reason at all” in the past week?
  • Have you neglected your own medical needs since you started caregiving?
  • Has it been more than a year since you visited your dentist or found a new one if you moved to start providing care?
  • Do you feel tired and listless most of the time?
  • Have you abandoned beloved hobbies due to lack of time or interest?
  • Are you more easily angered or upset than you used to be?
  • Is your fuse shorter than before you were a caregiver?
  • Has your patience decreased?
  • Do you think you will never have fun again?
  • Have you considered self-medication for depression or anxiety without consulting a physician?

Before any more time passes, seek help.

  • Ask a family member to visit more often and when they visit, if you can’t leave for long, take a walk outdoors. Enjoy the fresh air by yourself a few moments.
  • Invite one of your friends and one of your loved one’s friends over for lunch or dinner. Socialization is important for both of you.
  • If you have no local friends or family, check into agencies that provide respite care so you can take care of your own medical and dental needs.
  • Get a massage, pedicure, facial or manicure. If you can’t afford these, find a friend who will listen and give you a simple backrub.
  • Visit a nursing home, alone or with the one in your care, to gain perspective.
  • Practice gratitude. Think of one thing about your situation for which you are grateful. Every day, add to your list.

Caring for the Caregiver

       

My mother passed away, then six months later, my beloved father-in-law and six months after that, my dear, precious sister-in-law.

Since then, I have worked toward self-care, which isn’t as easy as it may seem.

One way I care for myself is to care for others, I’ve discovered. However, that doesn’t mean I must be a caregiver. I’ve turned into something of a tour guide when family visits and I love doing it!

Here are some of my recent adventures.

 

 

 

 

  

Question from a reader

My father has Parkinson’s and my brother was his caregiver for years but he said he’s burned out and I need to take over as Dad’s caregiver. How can I avoid burning out like my brother did?

You must remember that if you don’t take care of yourself, you cannot care for your father. It is vital that you take some time every single day for yourself to prepare each morning and unwind in the evening. It’s not selfish. It’s part of healthy caregiving. Seek out other caregivers to talk to. Get into the habit of regular caregiver texts, phone calls and social meetings for lunch or coffee. Set up a schedule for time away each week, then reward yourself with a weekend away at least once a month. Take a daily walk, alone, if you can. Breathe deeply and purposefully. Nurture your hobby or start a new one. Stay connected to you friends and call on your brother for helpful advice. Find out what worked and what didn’t work for him and remember: this is not permanent.
Caution

Education is a Caregiver’s Friend

Library booksYou will repeatedly read about burned-out or stressed-out caregivers because stress is one of the most common features among those who provide care for their loved ones. The stress comes from many sources such as constantly worrying they aren’t doing enough or aren’t doing the right thing the right way. Also, it is the result of working long hours and feeling unappreciated. A prime cause of this stress is inadequate preparation prior to joining the ranks of family caregivers.

Caregivers must educate themselves on whatever medical conditions their loved ones have and learn as much as they can about nutrition, possible side-effects of prescriptions and how to motivate or engage people who may seem content to waste away. It’s vital for caregivers to discover all they can about local support groups and community resources as well as the challenges of aging and the demands on caregivers. It’s essential for caregivers to know their own physical and emotional limits. Burnout comes from many sources, so it’s important to know ahead of time, who will be available to help in an emergency and where to find daily comfort.

Hydrant

If you want to take a break without feeling guilty, enroll in a Red Cross CPR/first aid class. You’ll have a few hours to yourself, be able to socialize with others and learn or brush up on a useful skill. If there isn’t a local Red Cross office, call your fire department and request a class.

 

 

What is the cutoff point? Exactly when can you stop crying, stop caring and start getting your own life back?  There is no easy answer for this. Sometimes, the end of caregiving comes when the ones in our care recover enough to care for themselves, but more often, caregiving ends with the death of our loved ones. The fact that you are a caregiver means you can’t stop caring, even if you stop being a caregiver. You will never regain the life you had before, but when caregiving ends, your life will be richer for the experience. Years from now, you may long for just one more day, despite the sadness and anxiety you feel now. The key is to find ways to make your caregiving experience work for both of you. If you have a respite schedule set up, use it consistently. Step away. Seek help from family, friends or local agencies. You may need to make many phone calls or research online for hours, but help is available. Whatever decision you make, guilt should play no part. If you have to walk away from caregiving for a few hours, a few days or a few years there is no reason to feel guilty. You are doing the best you can and for that, you deserve to spend whatever time you need to take care of yourself.

Most often, caregivers are family members with little or no formal training on how to provide nursing care for their loved ones. They might feel guilty about illnesses or injuries that occur under their care. Education is an important element for caregivers. You don’t need to know everything about nursing or nutrition, just be open to learning about those who can provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. If you are a caregiver or contemplating becoming one, learn what options are available to you. Discover alternative sources for respite and get creative when you need guilt-free time away. Spend a few hours at the library researching respite agencies or schedule a visit with a nutritionist to discuss your loved one’s dietary needs. Take a day off to plan activities both you and your loved one can enjoy together by educating yourself to what’s available in your neighborhood. Check with your library and local hospitals for classes on health-related topics. Learn all you can, then relax and let the experts help you create a better life for your loved one.

Learn all you canKnowing that you don’t need to know everything is crucial to lowering your stress level. You can relax more if you simply coordinate experts who will care for your loved one’s special needs. There’s no need to hire a personal chef, but if you consult a nutritionist for menu ideas based on your loved one’s dietary needs, planning meals will be much easier. If your loved one needs physical therapy or has a regular hair appointment, you can use this time to take a short break, even if it’s a walk in the parking lot or a quick phone call to a friend. Sometimes, just putting space between you and the one you are caring for helps adjust your stress level.

Email your questions about caregiving to mary@marybrotherton.com

Caregiver Tip

medicine cups can be fun

Buy inexpensive, plastic “shot glasses” to dispense medications. They are colorful and can be reused. They seem less industrial than small paper cups and add a bit of whimsy to the routine. Also, they seem to be easier for arthritic hands to hold.

Thanksgiving & National Family Caregiver’s Month

Caregiver with his motherNovember is National Family Caregivers Month, and rightfully so, with more than 65 million family caregivers in the United States, alone. Family caregivers are full-time partners with their loved ones, and because of the complexities involved in providing care at home, entire families are affected. This is a great time for caregivers and their families to express gratitude, not just to the caregiver, but to the one being cared for, as well.

If you want to express gratitude to the caregiver in your family’s life, here are some ideas:

  • Give tickets to an upcoming local event and offer to stay with your loved one while the caregiver takes a friend or other relative.
  • Consider a magazine subscription in a hobby of his or her choice and be sure the subscription can be read online, if the caregiver prefers to read e-books.
  • Home-cooked meals are almost always welcomed by caregivers.
  • Offer to simply come and keep the two of them company for a few hours. Pull out the old hard copies of photos and reminisce together.
  • Bring casseroles for the freezer in microwave or oven-safe dishes for “bad days.”
  • Stop by with a picnic lunch or tea party in the middle of the day. Be sure you call first to avoid doctor’s appointments and arrive early enough to set it up in time for lunch. Make sure you do all the post-party clean up, too.
  • Have flowers delivered.
  • Stop by for a visit with no expectations. See what unfolds.
  • Give the gift of an afternoon off, with a gift certificate for a pedicure or movie.
  • Plan an evening to relieve the caregiver, but bring a designated driver so the caregiver can go out for a few drinks without worries.
  • Ask your siblings or friends to bring potluck and photos for an evening of nostalgia. Be sure you stay to clean up afterwards.
  • Offer to visit while the caregiver tends to personal needs like doctor’s or hair appointments.
  • Pay for a haircut.
  • When you are doing your weekly shopping, buy some special foods you know your family will enjoy. Add in some paper products so the clean up is easy and stop by with a “Care Package.”

Respite

Thanksgiving Dinner should be a time for family unity and a chance to share gratitude, spend time with loved ones, but for the family caregiver it is often just one more thing to manage. As our families age and adult children relocate, our traditions change with our needs. If you are the caregiver for your aging parent(s) you may be expected to resume or resurrect old traditions. You may need to compromise. If your siblings have created new traditions, discuss ways you can include your parents so the burden of a full-blown Thanksgiving celebration doesn’t fall entirely on you. Consider if it may be time to create a new tradition and remember not doing things the way they’ve always been done is not a tragedy. It can be the beginning of something better.

hugRemember to always be grateful and to show your appreciation, even in little ways, it can make a big difference.

 

 

 

Self-Care

If you’re a caregiver, it’s important to take care of yourself, in addition to the one in your care. If you don’t, some day, someone will be taking care of you!

bottle

Definition of a word
Self-care
The care of oneself without medical or professional assistance or oversight from anyone else.

Question of the month
I live hundreds of miles from my grandmother, but visit at least once a year and I’ve noticed she seems to be declining more each time I visit. I think she’s thinner and I don’t think she can take care of herself properly. Should I mention this to my parents or aunts who live closer and check on her more than I can?

You owe it to your grandmother to tell those in a position to do something. Tell your parents your concerns, but don’t say just that you are worried about Nana. Give specific reasons for your alarm and be prepared to meet resistance from them or their siblings who may not be ready to acknowledge their mother needs assistance. It’s natural to delay discussing this subject and because they see her more often than you, it’s easy to overlook her gradual decline. Make a list of exactly what you have noticed changing from year to year and have some suggestions ready for intervention, including how you can help. With your grandmother’s permission, ask the entire family to pay to hire a housekeeper who also cooks and acts as companion. Including the whole family gives everyone a sense of control and your grandmother’s condition could improve.
nana
Caregiver Resource
CareNotes.com prints helpful brochures that are offered free in hospital or hospice chapels and other healthcare facilities. Caring for Yourself when You’re Caring for Someone Ill is only six pages, but covers the subject of self-care thoroughly. CareNotes  publications cover hundreds of topics and can be purchased individually or in bulk.

Hot Topic
Properly administered self-care
How you choose to provide self-care will depend on your particular personality, needs and your support team.

  • At the very least, learn to pace yourself and realize that relinquishing care to another family member or professional for a few hours is not selfish; it’s vital in the long run.
  • Recognize your own strengths and accept that you may need to call on outside sources to fill in some gaps. It is a sign of strength to request  help.
  • Find someone you can trust when you need to talk and don’t be embarrassed to discuss your negative feelings.
  • Be sure to include someone who will help you laugh.

Bongos Mary

Nurture your body with good nutrition and exercise, because if you don’t care for yourself, you cannot care for anyone else.

Fruits and Veggies

Feed your spirit, too. You may need to start by writing a wish list of things you want to do, events you hope to attend, places you’d like to visit when your caregiving tour comes to an end, and remember, it will come to an end.

Heron at Viera Wetlands1

Stress Relief Tips
Recognize your own needs before you offer to provide care for someone else. According to the staff of Kairos Support for Caregivers, caregivers fall into two categories:

  • those who act out of pity and ignore their own needs
  • those who act out of compassion and recognize the importance of caring for themselves as well.

Learn to recognize signs of caregiving stress and act to provide the best self-care possible.

first aid center

 

 

 

 

 

Caregiving Ends but Giving Care Continues

End of days

Even though my immediate HANC tour has ended, my writing about caregiving has not. I’ve been writing a column for Senior Life called Caregiving Counts as a way to continue my tribute to my mother and to HANCs everywhere.

My first column was simple, yet important tips for caregivers that I pulled from the Internet. Here is where you can read the full  article.

You may also read here:

10 Tips for Family Caregivers from caregiveraction.org

  1. Seek support from other caregivers.  You are not alone!
  2. Take care of your own health so that you can be strong enough to take care of your loved one.
  3. Accept offers of help and suggest specific things people can do to help you.
  4. Learn how to communicate effectively with doctors.
  5. Caregiving is hard work so take respite breaks often.
  6. Watch out for signs of depression and don’t delay in getting professional help when you need it.
  7. Be open to new technologies that can help you care for your loved one.
  8. Organize medical information so it’s up to date and easy to find.
  9. Make sure legal documents are in order.
  10. Give yourself credit for doing the best you can in one of the toughest jobs there is!

Each month I include a question of the month such as this one:

My father has Alzheimer’s Disease and some days, I just don’t think I can manage when he yells at me and tells me to go away. What should I do?

The best thing you can do is remember that everything ends. One day, you will wish your father was still around to yell at you. When he has tantrum moments, try to understand he isn’t trying to hurt you. The disease causes him to say things and act in ways he would never do, otherwise. This isn’t personal, but it does hurt. Be sure you have a strong support system you can call on at these times and as soon as you can, put some space between your father and yourself. If it’s safe to do so, take a walk when he demands you leave. By the time you return, he will likely have returned to his gentler self.

Some months I offer a definition.

Caregiver

Merriam Webster defines a caregiver as: a person who gives help and protection to someone such as a child, an old person, or someone who is sick.

If you have a specific question about caregiving, please contact me by leaving a comment through Facebook or email me: mary@marybrotherton.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Making it Easy for Others

House

When you make the life-altering decision to be a HANC, know your choice will affect others. Once you move into another person’s home, especially with your spouse, your life ceases to be exclusively your own. If that home belongs to a parent, your status as a competent adult will be challenged.

old woman

Regardless of frailties or medical conditions, your parent will always be your parent. You will hear things to make you wonder how your transition from child to adult had been overlooked. When siblings come to visit, they are not visiting you in your home. They are returning to their childhood home or coming home to Mom and Dad’s house. They will expect to find things as they had been for years and some will not be happy to see changes.

I need space

Make it easy on others by keeping things as close to how they were when you moved in. Change things slowly, subtly. It’s imperative to remember that your caregiving is a long-term commitment, if you are fortunate. It does not necessarily obligate you to live in another person’s home forever. At some point, your parents’ home may become your home, or you may return to a home of your own. Then, you can turn your energy toward redecorating or claiming your own space.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Until then, remember to do what you can to make things easier for others, so they will want to make things easy for you. They may not ease your stress, but they might lighten your workload. Even if they don’t, maintain your sense of humor. Stay flexible. Remember why you made the decision to become a caregiver and know that this is temporary.

sign

I’d heard, “I don’t know where anything is anymore,” from my mother and, “You’ve moved everything,” from my sisters so often, I’d begun to believe the myth that I’d moved things in my attempt to organize.

grits note

So I did something I thought might help on the occasional days my husband and I left the house, something I never would have considered under other circumstances. I labeled the kitchen cabinets. I thought it would help when we took our first full weekend off, but my sister still couldn’t find the grits.

grits shelf

Just smile and remember the real reason you made the choices you did.

Do Over

There are many things I wish I could go back and do a different way, where providing care for my mother is concerned.

I can’t do over anything, but if I could, I would:

  • Move in sooner so I had more time with my mother.

  • Be sure I knew where all her documents were before moving in and avoid the needle-in-the-haystack searches.

  • Write a sort of contract with my whole family’s input so everyone knew our roles clearly. Know beforehand, who already had roles to play and what they were.

  • Include in that contract what I was able and willing to contribute and what I expected in return.

  • Set up a backup to the verbal respite plan. As good as it sounds when someone says, “Just call me if you need help,” and “I’m here for you,” I’d remember that words carry little weight at 4 in the morning or when busy schedules interfere with my need for time off.

  • Set up a backup to the backup so my breaks and respite care are ensured. Have an emergency backup in place before I need it.

  • Before moving in, take extra time to discover the family’s understanding of the situation. I’d include them more and make sure they included me, too.

  • Insist that all my siblings and their children take time to do a Four Generation photo sooner, rather than wishing we had.

  • Listen more.

  • Play more.

  • Dance more.

  • Sing more (even if it is off key).

  • Go more with the flow and less against the stream.

  • Clean less.

  • Communicate better.

  • Prepare for the finality of the situation. In other words, I would have a plan in place for when my job as HANC ends, rather than wondering what I should do.

I may have other areas I’d like to do over, but first, I’d like to hear from you. What would you like to do over in your life? Not just as a caregiver, but in your life in general or in your “other career,” what would you like to do differently, if given the chance?

Write me at marybrotherton@gmail.com

and let’s start a dialogue about change!

 

 

 

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